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Student Representative Council

Student Representative Council

A whole school approach to Civics and Citizenship is demonstrated by the Student Representative Council.

All students from Years 1 – 6 take part in biannual elections run by the Electoral Education Centre using the preferential system of voting. Students from each year level who meet agreed criteria, nominate for the position and are endorsed by peers and their class teacher before elections are held. Successful councillors and deputies are then voted by their class members to represent them on the council. Pre-Primary students join council in semester 2.

Issues are discussed at weekly meetings led by the Head Boy and Head Girl. Decisions made are reported back to classes, at whole school assemblies and informal meetings with administration. Concerns regarding safety in the playground, lunch time activities, play equipment, educational concerns and better use of ICT resources, have been discussed and changes made that accommodate both staff and students. The student council is involved in community projects, raising money for The World’s Greatest Shave, collecting canned goods for Foodbank, selling poppies for the RSL and providing funds for our sister school in Cambodia, by gold coin donations on our Walk to School days each semester.

The student council was invited to be the advisory committee to the Commissioner for Children and Young People in 2010 with our Head Girl being appointed Commissioner for a Day. Beckenham councillors hosted a Kids Talk Fest where they worked collaboratively with other school leaders on projects that demonstrated their desire for safer communities and a need to better engage with all members of the community. Common interests, concerns and desires for the future were discussed and comments forwarded to the Commissioner.

In 2012, Beckenham student councillors were asked to contribute their voices and images to the Living Democracy exhibition at the Old Parliament House in Canberra. They shared their views on being involved in the democratic process and how they used their leadership skills to change the lives of others.

The student representative council gives students opportunities to be heard and to make changes for the betterment of others. They develop leadership skills and become positive role models in the classroom and playground. Councillors gain confidence in speaking to a wider audience and become more aware of their responsibilities as an active citizen in the school, local and global community.